You are here: Home - ARTISTS - Guo Jin

Con Brio – The Creations of Guo Jin

Con Brio – The Creations of Guo Jin

Julia Colman

 The art of Sichuan, southwestern China, is lyrical, subtle, flirting with mystery and more poetic than it bold and extrovert northern counterpart.  In Sichuan one feels the great distance from the heavy political atmosphere of Beijing.  The lush countryside is one of rice paddies where on torrid summer days water buffalo immerse themselves in pools of water and carpets of tiny, fiery red peppers dry on the roof of peasants’ houses.  The megalopolis of Chongqing, with well over 20 million inhabitants, is a chaotic, noisy, often surreal and impressive place.  The free market has taken off with a frontier spirit in this city on the banks of the Yangtze River.  Amid this chaos and struggle is the oasis of the Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts where Guo Jin is a tutor and where he has his studio.  The contrast could not be greater between the raw throb of Chongqing and the serenity of the tropical gardens in which the academy is set.

 Guo Jin creates in his own sanctuary of calmness.  With western classical music playing, there is an intense, harmonious and singular rapport between the artist and his canvas.  Guo Jin works are subtle combinations of delight, caprice, wistfulness and severity.  They demand time, thought and contemplation from the viewer.

 To most observers Guo Jin paintings appear as joyful renditions of childhood.  In the Happy Children series, started in 1996, he depicts jumping, sliding, bright and alert youngsters having a lot of uncomplicated fun.  Similary, the small portraits he also started painting in 1996 showing children dressed up as famous figures from history, both western and Chinese, or simply as some imaginative creation form their own fantasy, exude pure childish glee.  In more recent series, Badinerie and Little Ones Portraits, the gaiety continues.  The figures are dancing around the canvas or have just sat still long enough for their portrait to be captured while they plot their next game.  However, to some observers Guo Jin’s works appear immediately ominous.  The petrified appearance of the figures, like pitted stone sculptures, alive but all the same fixed, implies something lost, known only in memory, the past.  The lack of defined eyes but not of facial expression is disconcerting.  There is life in these forms but one of the most expressive components of character is absent.  Behind the gaiety is nostalgia and even something sinister.  In some of the Badinerie works there is an undefined shape in the corner of the canvas.  It looks like a claw, but a giant claw, perhaps of a lion or a dinosaur from the artist’s earlier paintings.  It is a worrying and unnerving element in a creation of such lightness.  In earlier paintings such as Memory No.1 1995 or the Sunlight of Season series, the predominant tone of the work is the eerie sense of unreality.  Children are sitting in their chairs but without energy.  One is observing children swinging but they are not moving.  We all know what swinging is like but these haunting children are ghosts.

 Guo Jin says of his art that it is a “reflection and contemplation of man’s naivete, that in representing children as he does he wants to try to retrieve the beauty of idealism that we were unaware of but that once we had.”  Most of his figures remind us of those delightful moments of childhood that are dimmed as the weight of adult concerns dominate life.  On another level, the process of opening to the West with all its commercial and materialist influence has brought a loss of idealism fro some Chinese, be it the loss of idealism as regards their own country or in what they expected from the West.  In the 1980s here were those artists who believed they could contribute to a regenerated and great Chinese culture and who probably hoped this could be achieved under the eyes of a complicit government.  The artists of the 1990s, although fiercely proud of being Chinese and perhaps more content to stay in their own country than the previous generation, are more detached from a communal effort of restoring Chinese greatness.  As a western observer one cannot help but link the unfathomable, dark side of Guo Jin’s works to the feeling one has in China of an omnipotent and omnipresent power.

 Freedom is another important element in Guo Jin’s work.  It functions on many different tiers.  There is great freedom of movement in the figures on these canvasses as they jump and slide.  There is the freedom to imitate, to taunt, to dress up as whomever one likes.  It is indicative of the freedom of creation which now exists in the Chinese artistic communities that Guo Jin can take Chinese icons such as the emperor, the PLA soldier, the Red Guard and Lei Feng (the model communist comrade widely used in propaganda campaigns), or western imports such as Zorro or Batman, and use them playfully.  Misuse of national icons or use of foreign symbols could have resulted in severe repercussions under the unrelenting regime of the Cultural Revolution.  This series of works is also about imagination and the freedom of choice facing a child, its freedom to choose what it wants to be, again a novelty in a country that until recently decided for its young what they should study.  These may seem very simple issues but the power of Guo Jin’s work is that their very essence is captured and delivered so successfully that the viewer realizes the contribution of innocence, delight, imagination and freedom to an individual and a society must never be dimmed again. 


Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /data/www/online.artdepot.cn/library/Zend/Db/Table/Abstract.php on line 1259

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /data/www/online.artdepot.cn/library/Zend/Db/Table/Abstract.php on line 1259